Gifted?

One of the many challenges I am back to addressing is that I am in the gifted crowd. On one hand, this sort of takes care of itself. I always have things to catch my attention, from books and projects to ideas and more questions. Then there are the times when being gifted isn’t so easy: When I’m bored or depressed, lonely, misunderstood and out of sinc with everyone around me.
Perhaps the most difficult time for me is when I am working to fit into a group of regular people. I am like a zebra, trying to blend in with a herd of palaminos: It simply does not work.
I have been in a couple of situations recently that required me to “dummy down.” That is like trying to get a halogen lamp to act like a candle.
Can you relate to this? Do you know of more resources? Are you a gifted adult?
I hope we can share information and ideas.

Linda Silverman, PhD developed a scale to measure giftedness. You can find it at
http://www.gifteddevelopment.com/ADJ/Adult_Giftedness.htm

When I was in graduate school in the mid 80’s, one of my peers brought an article to our field placement. It was life changing for me: It was the first time since learning my IQ when I was in high school that I had to consider giftedness.
That article is at

http://www.sengifted.org/…/can-you-hear-the-flowers-sing-issues-for-gifted-ad…‎

SENG has focused on children for the most part; however, they are doing more with adults.

One site I found that has some really good information is
http://www.architectureofmeaning.com/

There are some books out there as well. I am reading one called, “The gift of Being Uncommon, Extra Intelligent Intense and Effective,” by Willem Kuipers
So far, so good.
Have you read any you especially liked?

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6 thoughts on “Gifted?

  1. The article titled “Can You Hear the Flowers Sing” was very insightful! Now I understand a couple of the people in my life better than before! Thanks for sharing!

    • Hi, Vicki, Thanks for commenting. I think one challenge for gifted people and those who know them is that the struggles gifted people have are not recognized, often not even by those who are gifted themselves. I am grateful to have found some things that help. Share this with those people you know – it might encourage and help them as well.

  2. So, here’s a challenging story: I used to have a friend in Portland, who is gifted/plenty bright. This person is not a Christian and is adamant that he/she doesn’t want to be because, “Rebirth causes brain damage.” I myself have had more than one person tell me that my intellect prevents me from having faith. More recently, someone told me that he/she is laying down anything having to do with intellect so that this person can experience the Holy Spirit more fully. My own view on this is, God is the One who made us gifted. He is far more intelligent, creative and capable than the brightest, most gifted person among us, so He can handle anything we come up with. Any talent or gift, submitted to the Holy Spirit is powerful and gives glory to God; maybe people need to relax and enjoy what God gives them in His creation of them. What are your thoughts?

  3. My aunt Vicki, who commented above, passed this post of yours along to me, thinking (correctly) that I would find it interesting. I am running off to work right now, but I wanted to quickly comment, and leave you a couple links to articles I’ve found about the difficulties of being unusually intelligent.

    Briefly, I’d just like to say that, for me too, fitting in and feeling at home with other people is probably the most constant problem of being gifted. The zebra in the herd of palominos can never be wholly accepted or understood by the rest, and can never quite find peers. Adding to the sense of isolation that being always alone in the midst of crowds causes, is that you usually can’t talk about why you feel like an outsider without offending people with your effrontery in thinking yourself smarter than them. Obviously it’s a delicate thing to discuss in even the best of circumstances, and I hope I’ve developed some gracefulness and tact because of it, but it still leaves you lonely when you can’t say what’s true and really going on even when someone who cares about you asks. Smile and nod and say that you’re tired, and quietly feel even more alienated than before.

    The articles I’ll link here are both by a man named Grady Towers, who was a member of some of the high IQ societies, and who was interested in IQ and its interaction with personality, adjustment, and why the high IQ societies seemed so full of ineffective, unsuccessful people. Among other things, of course.

    The Outsiders: http://www.worlddreambank.org/O/OUTSIDRS.HTM

    The Empty Promise: http://www.eskimo.com/~miyaguch/grady/emptypromise.html

    Hope you find them interesting.

    • Hello, Jeff, Interesting indeed! I think one of the most important changes in identifying gifted people, perhaps especially adults, is the broadening of criteria. That is one reason I really appreciate the work that SENG and Dr. Linda Silverman have done. As one who is gifted, I challenge myself to find ways to excel, instead of squandering my abilities. Even then, I am often stymied by the plethora of choices. Then, there are those challenging social issues! I can certainly understand why many exceptionally intelligent people would describe themselves as outsiders. I also got a kick out of the idea of learning to have grace with fools. I tend to think of giftedness as the parable of talents…literally. If I have five, may I turn them into ten. May I use my resources to make the world a better place, if only slightly; meanwhile, I am so delighted when I meet another gifted soul – comradery is wonderful! Thanks for commenting; do come back.

  4. A couple of days ago, a friend of mine told me that he thinks the whole matter of “talented and gifted” is bogus. I disagree, of course. This does bring up an interesting topic that I might have to address in a separate article: It seems that there is a great deal of effort homogenize society. If someone seems too emotional, he or she is bipolar; if someone excels, it is counted as insignificant. Okay, I might be exagerrrating a little. What do you think?

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